• Borobudur is a ninth-century Mahayana Buddhist monument in Magelang, Central Java, Indonesia. The monument comprises six square platforms topped by three circular platforms, and is decorated with 2,672 relief panels and 504 Buddha statues.[1] A main dome, located at the center of the top platform, is surrounded by 72 Buddha statues seated inside perforated stupa.
  • Mount Semeru also known as Mahameru ("Great Mountain"), is one of Indonesia's most active volcanoes. What stands out most about this mountain is the fact that it erupts periodically (and very reliably so). Every 20 minutes or so, the volcano belches out a huge cloud of steam and smoke,
  • Mt. Bromo volcano in East Java is the active cone inside the giant Tengger caldera, one of Indonesia's most scenic locations destination in East Java, famous for its magnificient sunrise views and the panorama over the caldera with Semeru volcano in the background. .

Batik Pekalongan, Traditional batik Motif


Indonesia has two major kinds of handmade traditional garment. Along with kain tenun, Indonesian hand-woven fabric, batik is Indonesia’s highly praised and most developed cultural traditions. Having tens of local variants, Java batik is among the most famous in Indonesian batik market. Developed in various community of Javanese society, today’s Java batik is enriched with thousands of pattern detail.


Java batik flourished within almost every communities in all part of the island. In preserving and developing it, each community grows with their own creativity and interpretation toward surrounding environment. This is how patterns, colors, and philosophy of batik differs between communities.


In terms of its mass production, there are at least three places famous for being Javanese batik centers; they are Yogyakarta, Surakarta (Solo), and Pekalongan. In brief, the patterns, colors, and philosophy of batik from the first two reflects its origin from aristocrat communities. More flexibility in patterns, richer colors, and different philosophical interpretation of Pekalongan Batik represents its origin from common society with lesser formal tradition.


History said that Yogyakarta batik had its distinctive character after Giyanti agreement in 1755. It was the moment when Pangeran Mangkubumi, also known as Sultan Hamengkubuwana I, were willing to take and preserve Mataram royal clothes to his part of recently split Mataram Kingdom, Yogyakarta. Since then, Yogyakarta batik was developed around this circle by maintaining the traditional pattern and value of the previous Mataram kingdom.


Today, Yogyakarta preserves up to 1900 traditional batik motifs. Most of them uses black or white for its background and strong colors such as any tone of brown for its central motif. Geometrical arrangement of repeated motifs are common in this style. As there are many verbal consensus surrounding Yogyakarta’s batik, the form of batik garment ranges only in formal clothes for men, to jarit (a large piece of batik used for wrapping upper to lower part of body) and selendang (a long, narrow band of batik used as accessory) for women.


At the same moment Yogyakarta created its batik identity, Sri Paduka Pakubuwana III, the first king of Mataram’s other half, decided to create new clothing norms as well as motifs for his Surakarta Kingdom. This development of contemporary norms and motifs of Surakarta batik is still in progress. It explains how Solo Batik seems more liquid, less attached to old rules and norms than its counterpart’s.


Batik from Surakarta or Solo enjoys more fans and development. Batik craftsmanship in Solo has applied batik in many kinds of medium from shrewd to silk. More than that, Surakarta has more than 6000 batik patterns and the number is still growing. Since a long time ago, the town accommodates the trade of its batik by building a special batik market popularly called Pasar Klewer.


Situated away from those aristocratic environments, Pekalongan raised as a newer competitor in batik industry. Pekalongan artists saw batik as a fertile medium to express their imagination, with less value attached, freer interpretation, but still follows the basic principle in terms of production method. Accepting new ideas and allowing less traditional principles, Pekalongan batik gain popularity from its newly created motifs and larger capacity of production.


Pekalongan batik has more dynamic motifs and richer color. Bright red and green are common color backgrounds for Pekalongan batik. Its freer in patterns and lesser in philosophy explains why Pekalongan batik has less geometric patterns. Some negative arguments raised when its batik industry adopt printing method do not stop it from being famous.


Indonesia has two major kinds of handmade traditional garment. Along with tenun, Indonesian native woven fabric, batik is one of Indonesia’s highly praised and most developed cultural traditions. Having tens of local variants, Javanese batik is among the most famous in Indonesian batik market. Developed in various community of Javanese society, today’s Javanese batik is enriched with thousands of motif detail.


Javanese Batik flourishes within almost every communities in all part of the island. In preserving and developing it, each community grows with their own creativity and interpretation toward surrounding environment. This is how patterns, colors, and philosophy differs from a community to the other.


In terms of industry, there are at least three places famous for being Javanese batik centers; they are Yogyakarta, Surakarta (Solo), and Pekalongan. In brief, the patterns, colors, and philosophy of batik from the first two reflects its origin from aristocrat communities. More flexibility in patterns, richer colors, and different philosophical interpretation of Pekalongan Batik represents its origin from common society with lesser formal tradition.


History said that Yogyakarta batik had its distinctive character after Giyanti agreement in 1755. It was the moment when Pangeran Mangkubumi, also known as Sultan Hamengkubuwana I, were willing to take and preserve Mataram royal clothes to his part of recently split Mataram Kingdom, Yogyakarta. Since then, Yogyakarta batik was developed around this circle by maintaining the traditional pattern and value of the previous Mataram kingdom.


Today, Yogyakarta preserves up to 1900 traditional batik motifs. Most of them uses black or white for its background and strong colors such as any tone of brown for its central motif. Geometrical arrangement of repeated motifs are common in this style. As there are many verbal consensus surrounding Yogyakarta’s batik, the form of batik garment ranges only in formal clothes for men, to jarit (a large piece of batik used for wrapping upper to lower part of body) and selendang (a long, narrow band of batik used as accessory) for women.


At the same moment Yogyakarta created its batik identity, Sri Paduka Pakubuwana III, the first king of Mataram’s other half, decided to create new clothing norms as well as motifs for his Surakarta Kingdom. This development of contemporary norms and motifs of Surakarta batik is still in progress. It explains how Solo Batik seems more liquid, less attached to old rules and norms than its counterpart’s.


Batik from Surakarta or Solo enjoys more fans and development. Batik craftsmanship in Solo has applied batik in many kinds of medium from shrewd to silk. More than that, Surakarta has more than 6000 batik patterns and the number is still growing. Since a long time ago, the town accommodates the trade of its batik by building a special batik market popularly called Pasar Klewer.


Situated away from those aristocratic environments, Pekalongan raised as a newer competitor in batik industry. Pekalongan artists saw batik as a fertile medium to express their imagination, with less value attached, freer interpretation, but still follows the basic principle in terms of production method. Accepting new ideas and allowing less traditional principles, Pekalongan batik gain popularity from its newly created motifs and larger capacity of production.


Pekalongan batik has more dynamic motifs and richer color. Bright red and green are common color backgrounds for Pekalongan batik. Its freer in patterns and lesser in philosophy explains why Pekalongan batik has less geometric patterns. Some negative arguments raised when its batik industry adopt printing method do not stop it from being famous.


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